On the road to Clan William, we were taught different types of mountains and how old they are.  We were taught about rocks, how to make cement, and different factories along Malmesbury.

On our way to Clan William there were also rivers, and it was the geologist who taught us these things and the rivers’ names.  There was always time for everything, and we went to a restaurant for lunch.

After we arrived at the place where we were staying, we just took a few minutes break and hit the road again.  We went to a forest where San people lived a long time ago.  Our tour guide showed us places where the San people wrote; they did not have pens and papers like us, so they wrote on rocks, even if they had experienced something new.  We were taught about different kinds of paint they used.

Lorna (second from left) holding a reptile's skin with her peers.

We were taught different kinds of animals that lived in that particular area and where they have ended up today.  We took pictures of that place.  It was a two hour trip.  We were all tired and we all wanted to take a lift down the mountain.  When we were going up there, we did not want to take a lift because we had energy and we all wanted to experience our trip.  After that we went back to our rooms tired, and some of us took a bath.  At about seven o’clock, we had a full supper, drinks, and biscuits.

Then we went to our rooms to relax, and they brought us chips and sweets.  After everyone relaxed, we went outside and played games.  There were not only Ikamva learners, there were also UCT (University of Cape Town) students and a Geologist.  They came up with new games we did not know, and we also gave them games they did not know.  We had a lot of fun there.

In the morning after finishing everything, we went to a hotel for breakfast.  Most of us did not want to go becasue we were still having fun.  We had acknowledged a great experience.  Even on our way back we did not come back the way we went, and we got to see other mountains and rivers.

Above picture: Lorna (second from left) holding a reptile’s skin with her peers.

Special Thanks to Dr. Carl Palmer and sponsors of the trip