Annual Report 2013

Annual Report 2013

The 2013 IkamvaYouth Annual Report highlights the remarkable achievements that we have made in 2013 by enabling disadvantaged youth to pull themselves and each other out of poverty with education.You can view the full annual report here but here are some of the highlights from 2013:

  • 92% of our learners passed their matric (including supplementary exams); 62% achieved a bachelor pass (compared to 30.6% nationally) and 90% of our learners accessed a post school opportunity (tertiary, learnership or employment);
  • The first survey of IkamvaYouth’s alumni was conducted. The findings were more encouraging than we could have hoped: IkamvaYouth learners are almost half as likely to drop out of tertiary studies, four times more likely to graduate and are three times less likely to not be in education or employment than the average South African young person.  
  • IkamvaYouth WON the Stars Award which exists to reward outstanding local organisations improving the lives of children in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. IkamvaYouth WON in the category of Education in Africa and the Middle East.

Thank you for taking the future into your hands, and to holding ours. Let’s keep reaching for the stars together.

 

©Neo Ntsoma/Majority World

 

If you are having trouble with the link please click on the below link: 

ikamvayouth_annual_report_2013.pdf

ERM Costal Clean-Up

ERM Costal Clean-Up

“On the third Saturday of September each year (20 September 2014), volunteers around the world take part in the world’s biggest coastal cleanup, known as International Coastal Cleanup Day. The event has been held internationally each year for over 20 years, when people head to the beaches and begin removing debris and rubbish from shorelines, waterways and oceans”.

 

 

This year was no different, as the Western Cape Ikamvanites took to the Helderberg Marine protected area coast to clean the 4 km of beach which is the least disturbed part of the northern shore of False Bay. The Nyanga Ikamvanites came out in numbers and were more than excited to participate in such a great initiative of keeping our coasts clean. 

 

COASTAL CLEAN-UP

COASTAL CLEAN-UP

“On the third Saturday of September each year (20 September 2014), volunteers around the world take part in the world’s biggest coastal clean-up, known as International Coastal Clean-up Day. The event has been held internationally each year for over 20 years, when people head to the beaches and begin removing debris and rubbish from shorelines, waterways and oceans”.

This year was no different, as the Western Cape Ikamvanites took to the Helderberg Marine protected area coast to clean the 4 km of beach which is the least disturbed part of the northern shore of False Bay. The Western Cape Ikamvanites came out in numbers and were more than excited to participate in such a great initiative of keeping our coasts clean.

Sesethu Soboyisi says “If the current generation doesn’t take care of the earth, what kind of earth will the next generation inherit?”

The Clean-up was fun, it took us outside of our usual areas of residence and had us doing something good for Mother Nature” says Bubele Fokazi

This great day was made possible by various partners, thanks to the ERM team for inviting Ikamva to the coastal clean-up day.

 

Thank you very much to Arne Purves for the beautiful pictures, as found on this blog. 

Tutor appreciation for Nyanganites

Tutor appreciation for Nyanganites

After an intense 2 weeks of tutoring and workshops for almost 100 learners, Nyanga tutors spent a very well deserved afternoon at Ace’s in Khatyelitsha, for their tutor appreciation.

This year’s tutor appreciation was unique and extra special, since the majority of tutors who participated are Nyanga ex-learners from the classes of 2011, 12 and 13. As such, the tutor appreciation became something of a re-union for these Nyanganites who were once learners together, and are now paying it forward by tutoring younger ikamvanites during school and university holidays.  

The superheroes chose the theme  ‘Lets cool the sweat’  in recognition of the hard work they put in over the 10 days of Winter School during the July holidays.

One of the tutors had the following to say: ‘I really agree with the team when they say we’re cooling the sweat. We worked very hard those 10 days; running to Zolani Centre in the morning to catch the bus, intense tutor meetings with disagreements and livey debates and of course the tutoring everyday.’

Well done to our committed volunteers who made Winter School a success, and your appreciation event was well deserved!  

WC Matric Camp 2014

WC Matric Camp 2014

Following the success of the matric camp in 2013, the WC team ran the second annual matric camp following directly on after the two weeks of winter school in July.  This year saw 85 matrics from the Western Cape branches as well as from the Eastern Cape get together for a week getaway at the Rotary Glencairn camp site, for 5 days of intensive tutoring, academic workshops and exam practice.

 

 

The first day saw all the learners arriving at the site and participating energetic team-building exercises to help break the ice as learners started interacting more freely across the branches, working collectively to earn points for their various teams. True to ikamvanite culture, tutoring started in earnest from day one and the learners spent the rest of the afternoon working through past exam papers and Answer Series guides.

Throughout the camp learners have all managed to take part in a variety of activities aimed at preparing them for their final exams and tertiary studies. From intensive tutoring and exam practice to workshops around how to study effectively and evening self study times.

 

While the camp is a serious study boot camp, with tutoring happening from early in the morning until late into the night, the learners found the time to energise themselves through the terrible weather with an impromptu talent show where learners mixed things up between branches for an evening of singing, dancing, stand up comedy and drama.  I’m convinced the next MC Solaar is in this group! 

Sixolisiwe sibebosi , a volunteer said the following: ‘The matric camp was very productive to me. Firstly everything was well prepared, the kids were hungry to learn something and that gave me a lot of courage and it motivated me to make sure that I give all and make a change. IkamvaYouth changed my life and I also passed my matric because of IkamvaYouth and matric camp so it was a minor thing for me tor do, I wish I could do more.’

 

Bonke Sibunzana, a learner from Masi said the following, what I liked about matric camp was how committed the tutors were. They encouraged us to use the tutoring time wisely. I also like how united we were as ikamvanites. We showed love and support for each other ‘, while Nobulali Swaartbooi from Nyanga said ‘Matric camp was a great experience. It was great learning with people from different schools and coming together with all our different ideas.’

This strongly echoes IY’s value of peer-to-peer sharing and IY is excited to witness the fruit of the Matric camp as the learners write their mock exams in September and final exams in November. 

A very special thank you to Pick’n Pay Fish Hoek, for generously supplying camp catering, and ensuring that all our learners, volunteers and staff are well fed every day of the camp; Rotary for their beautiful camp sites and ERM for the donation of solar lamps for all our matric learners. This gives out learners going into their final exams the opportunity to study at home in the evenings, thanks ERM!

 

 

Good luck for the final exams IY 2014 Matric Class! 


My journey at IkamvaYouth

My journey at IkamvaYouth

My name is Sesethu Nika, doing my 1st year at UCT 

I joined Ikamva Youth (Makhaza Branch) in the year 2012 while doing grade 11. A friend of mine brought Ikamva to my attention so I decided to apply. Luckily for me I got accepted. Joining Ikamva was the most helpful decision for my academic life.

Even though I was an average learner, I needed an environment that would allow me to reach my fullest potential and Ikamva Youth provided me with that platform. Not only did I get great assistance with my academics but I also got a chance to make new friends and meet phenomenal and inspirational people.

Attending the career exhibitions with my fellow Ikamvanites helped me a lot. I got to see what my strength and weaknesses are in order for me to choose the career path that was most suitable for me. I also got involved in the Ikamva Youth Debate Club which helped increase my confidence levels and public speaking skills. Ikamva prepared me for the big bad world.

With all of the assistance, positive energy, encouragement and inspiration from both tutors and learners, I was aspired to work harder and achieve my best. Because of my matric results I was accepted at UWC and UCT and decided to take the UCT offer.

I am currently a student at UCT doing a degree in BSocSci majoring in Environmental and Geographical Science as well as Public policy Administration. Life at university is not all roses. It is quite demanding and needs someone who is focused and knows what they want to achieve in life. Having independence is wonderful and helps one find their feet and be able to stand on their own. Unlike high school where one can depend on educators, university is a totally different story.

Getting to university is not a walk in the park and completing a degree is even more challenging. One has to know what they want in life, they has to be hungry for education. Having education is the sharpest weapon that one can use to fight against poverty, crime, unemployment, ignorance and all other forces that are preventing people from reaching success.

Like all Ikamvanites would say “Ikamva Lisezandleni Zethu”..

 

Lloyd Lungu

031 909 3590
lloyd@ikamvayouth.org
2525 Ngcede Grove, Umlazi AA Library, 4031

Lloyd is a self-disciplined and highly goal-driven Industrial Psychology Honours graduate. He is currently a Master's candidate completing his second year of M.Com in Industrial Psychology at the University of the Free State. Lloyd joined IkamvaYouth as a learner in 2012, after matriculating he came back and volunteered as a tutor for the duration of his undergraduate studies at UKZN. He later worked as an Intern in the Chesterville branch. His passion for youth empowerment and inclusion has grown enormously through his time and experience gained within IkamvaYouth and has inspired him to provide career guidance to young township people. He is currently working at the Umlazi Branch as a Branch Assistant.