Annual Report 2012

Annual Report 2012

To mark IkamvaYouth’s 10th Anniversary, we’re celebrating the Superheroes who’ve helped us to achieve the landmark successes worth celebrating. Read all about them and our super achievements in the latest IkamvaYouth 2012 Annual Report.

If you want to download the file, click below

Annual Report 2012

Among superheroes, lessons learned and our vision for 2030, you’ll find a board game where you can play the highs and lows of IkamvaYouth’s first decade. Download the Game tokens here. 

 

Final 2012 matric pass and placement numbers are out!

Final 2012 matric pass and placement numbers are out!

The results of matric supplementary exams are out, and IkamvaYouth is proud to report an amazing overall 94% matric pass for the class of 2012! Even more impressive is that an incredible 90% of these passes are of either Bachelor or Diploma quality.

IkamvaYouth is proud of our learners, and especially those who were undeterred by the blow of failing the first time round. “Second chances don’t always mean a happy ending. This was the chance for supplemental learners to end their Matric on the right note. They all grabbed the opportunity and made it happen,” says Makhaza branch coordinator Zukile Keswa.

And Ikamvanites aren’t passing by choosing easy subjects. IkamvaYouth matriculants are almost twice as likely to achieve a pass including pure Mathematics (45%) and Physical Sciences (37%) as their school peers (24% of whom pass Maths and 22% Science).

Matric is just the beginning of lifelong learning, and over 73% of all IkamvaYouth’s 2012 matrics have accessed tertiary education this year and are now studying further at Certificate, Diploma or Degree level. More than half of these young men and women, 43% of our whole matric cohort, have enrolled at Universities or Universities of Technology.

Our supplementary writers have secured placements too, through their grit and determination.

“I was not happy to see other Ikamvanites going to varsity. I was angry at myself for failing. One of the things that kept me going was the support I got from IkamvaYouth and other 2012 matriculants. They were helping. I am now studying mechanical engineering at Northlink College.  At least now I am also a student like other Ikamvanites,” says Anele Sololo.

Most of our learners’ parents and guardians are unemployed, or working as domestic workers, cleaners or labourers. Ikamvanites are on the path to greatly improving their families’ circumstances as they enter fields of study including Chemistry, Accounting, Teaching, Engineering and IT.

“Looking back to my family’s financial instability, I thought I wasn’t going to reach university… Then a week later, I received an email notifying me that I have been given 90% bursary towards my tuition to study this course, with the accommodation paid for. I was really overwhelmed, I couldn’t believe it,” wrote Talent Chinogureyi, who matriculated at our Chesterville branch and is now studying a B.Com in Politics, Philosophy & Economics at St Augustine College.

Another 20% of the IkamvaYouth class of 2012 – most of those who did not access tertiary education – are now in learnerships or employment. And 2% are returning to school this year, to upgrade their matric results.

That brings our post-school placements for the class of 2012 to 96% – a brilliant result considering that nationally, almost 42% of South Africans aged 18-24 are not in employment, education or training.

2013 off to a flying start for Makhaza

2013 off to a flying start for Makhaza

The weekend consisted of planning for 2013 as well as an election to choose the new branch committee as well as choosing the different heads of the different portfolios. Present were more than 30 learners from different grades and tutors and they all had a chance to discuss the decision making, planning and electing the branch committee.

The Main goal of our SPW was to elect a branch committee (in charge of roles and portfolios) and for new volunteers (grade12 from last year returning) to take ownership of programme and become part of the management team. It was also a great weekend for the leaner reps and tutors to get to know each other better.

On Saturday we discussed the year program and we also had a look back at what happened in 2012. The morning started off with an introduction and the group explaining what their expectations of the weekend will be, we then discussed what happened in 2012 and then we ended with looking at what IkamvaYouth is doing well, what challenges we are facing, what IkamvaYouth is offering learners and the community and what we can do to improve the programme. We had a lot of first time branch committee members, but the rest of the group made them all feel included and welcome.

On Sunday the election took place and everyone had a chance to vote for the different nominees. The nomination and election process were very democratic and the nominees had to explain to the group why they were best suited for the different portfolios. The different portfolios were Tutoring, Volunteer Coordination, Career Guidance, Media, Image and Expression, Computer Literacy, Health and Life Skills and Alumni.

The different portfolio members also had to discuss their portfolios and present a plan of action for the group and will need to present this plan of action to all the Ikamvanites at Makhaza. They had to present their goals, when the goals should be reached and by whom. Emihle, a grade 8 learner and newly appointed portfolio member said that the weekend was a dream come true and that she enjoyed the interaction and discussions that took place and that she is really happy and proud for being chosen as part of the health and life skills portfolio.

Mandisi Gladile, a tutor says, “the weekend was really informative and made me realise the value IkamvaYouth adds not only to the learners but also the community and I feel really inspired for the things that we have planned for 2013.”

strategic_planning_week_2013.pdf

Open Day 2013 in Gauteng

Open Day 2013 in Gauteng

Saturday the 26th of January 2013 was a very special day for IkamvaYouth Gauteng as we opened our doors to new applications for the year. Open Day for both branches in Gauteng were jointly held at Ebony Park and it was exciting to see over 600 learners in attendance. The new applicants were all eager to see what IkamvaYouth had to offer and how they would be assisted to improve their marks. 

The day started off with the District Coordinator, Patrick Mashanda, explaining what IkamvaYouth was all about and how IkamvaYouth would assist the learners within the community. Many of our supporters including ABI, Tzu Chi Foundation, Advtech, Mindset Network, ERM, EOH, Thoughtworks were present cheering all the learners on to take responsibility for their future and improve their marks.

(The Tzu Chi Foundation Team)

A prize giving ceremony immediately followed and all learners with over 80% attendance for 2012 were awarded certificates of achievement and the Grade 12’s with distinctions were recognised. Ntebaleng Morake, a Grade 12 with 4 distinctions, said a few words to thank everyone who supports IkamvaYouth and also encouraged learners to know that they too could excel at school.

(Ntebaleng Morake receiving her award)

Loads of fun ended the day off with donations of cokes, a DJ and music from ABI and pies from King Pie.

(Pies from King Pie being prepared for the aspiring Ikamvanites)

We are ready to change some lives this year, are you?

Numeric and Khan Academy

Numeric and Khan Academy

Just over a year ago I was approached by Andrew Einhorn, a UCT grad student, who was interested in implementing an online maths program at Makhaza. All he needed was access to the lab, access to a class and a tutor. A year down the line not only he has completely revamped two of our branches labs in Makhaza and Nyanga, established a formal Khan Academy program in these branches (as well as other locations in Cape Town and rural Eastern Cape), but has produced results at very low costs, and is piloting in schools for 2013. 

His passion for creating high impact and stimulating learning environments in township and rural locations often only privy to the wealthy few has seen him start Numeric, an NGO interested in finding ways to bring Khan Academy to South Africa and make it a useful resource to both teachers and learners. He presented an inspiring TEDxUCT talk last year outlining the background, as well as the impact and results Numeric has had. He also posted the following blog on the Khan Academy website:

 

A little over 15 months ago, we started an experiment.  We wanted to know if Khan Academy was viable in township (slum) areas in South Africa and if so, what type of impact it might have on numeracy.   Numeracy in South Africa is astonishingly weak, with just 2% of Grade 9s scoring over 50% on the annual national assessments in 2012. 

And so we set out to see if Khan Academy might be used as a catalyst for change.  But before I expound on the results of this experiment, I ought perhaps give a little more background on the environments we’re working in.

Townships in South Africa are not unlike the favelas of Brazil or the slums bordering Delhi and Calcutta in India.  They are urban areas that were, until the end of Apartheid in 1994, reserved for non-whites, but have now become residential hubs for the urbanizing masses.  They are typically built on the periphery of cities and tend to be characterized by high population density, poverty and unemployment.  Picture a ramshackle of makeshift houses constructed out of corrugated iron, wood scraps and cardboard, jigsawed together into a gigantic maze 5 miles wide and 10 miles across.  At the risk of generalising grossly, that’s more or less the picture I want you to have in mind as you read this article.

Now, townships in South Africa get a bad rap.  They are viewed as ‘dangerous’ places and it is considered unwise to visit them unless you know someone there, or visit them as part of a ‘township tour’.  Yet while crime rates in these areas are often high, the reputation does not do justice to the vibrant and persevering people who inhabit them.  In particular, townships are YOUNG!  On any given day, around two o’clock in the afternoon, the streets flood with uniformed, backpack-toting children on their way home from school.  And despite having barely two pennies to rub together, they are meticulously dressed – shiny black shoes, starched white collars – and have aspirations to match.   Most of the children in South Africa live in some form of township, which means that children growing up in these environments constitute the better part of the future of our country.

And yet it is supremely difficult to convince our best teachers to go and work in these areas.  They are offered good jobs in well-resourced schools most often located in the wealthy suburbs of the cities.  Principals at these schools compete fiercely for their skills.  And this is as it should be.  But it also entrenches the educational bias whereby a child’s access to quality education is directly proportional to the wealth of their family (see chart below).  

 

* University exemption rate refers to the percentage of learners who attain the academic marks in their final year of school that are necessary to gain access to South African universities.

So Numeric’s experiment was to see whether we could use Khan Academy, in conjunction with a slightly less skilled (and often unqualified) math coach, to create the high impact and stimulating learning environments enjoyed by kids living in wealthier suburbs.

The opportunity provided by Khan Academy premised on the following:  Videos do not argue about where they are played; they are unaffected by crime and environment. Appropriately licensed, they do not cost anything.  They do not grow weary, skip class, or grow jaded.  Instead, they convey their message enthusiastically, faithfully, clearly – time and time again.  A child may watch just as many videos as he/she has appetite for, and need never feel limited by the dragging on of a boring class or an inept teacher.  For many children in South Africa, a Khan Academy video will be their first exposure to what we might term ‘world class instruction’.  When complemented by the exercises on the Knowledge Map, Khan Academy becomes a powerful tool for turning the tide on numeracy in South Africa.

So what were the results of the experiment?  Well, it’s probably too early to draw any major conclusions, but we do have a few figures we’d like to share.  We currently run 7 Khan Academy classes across 3 different hubs in the Eastern and Western Cape provinces of South Africa.  The first pilot group of 20 Grade 9s has just completed its first twelve months of Khan Academy and their numbers are as follows:

* Total Khan Academy hours delivered:  2220

* Total Problems Solved:  27,988

* Total Problems per learner:  1399

* Total Khan Modules Complete:  1232

* Average Modules per learner:  62

Bearing in mind this is an afterschool programme, these are 27,988 math problems that would not otherwise have been attempted.  The 62 modules completed by the average learner constitute 62 gaps that those learners have filled.   But it’s more about just the numbers; it’s about creating excitement and enthusiasm around learning.  This is hard to convey in words, but perhaps a picture will suffice.

 

As we always say to our coaches, the tragedy in South Africa is not so much that kids don’t want to learn.  It’s that some kids DO want to learn, but can’t.  Khan Academy provides us one way to give these kids a world-class education without having to magically replenish our nation’s supply of teachers.  And who knows, perhaps one day these kids will become the inspirational and talented teachers we have waited for for so long!

—-

Andrew Einhorn is the founder and current CEO of Numeric.org. His TEDx talk on Numeric.org and Khan Academy is available here.

Numeric and Khan Academy

Numeric and Khan Academy

Just over a year ago I was approached by Andrew Einhorn, a UCT grad student, who was interested in implementing an online maths program at Makhaza. All he needed was access to the lab, access to a class and a tutor. A year down the line not only he has completely revamped two of our branches labs in Makhaza and Nyanga, established a formal Khan Academy program in these branches (as well as other locations in Cape Town and rural Eastern Cape), but has produced results at very low costs, and is piloting in schools for 2013. 

His passion for creating high impact and stimulating learning environments in township and rural locations often only privy to the wealthy few has seen him start Numeric, an NGO interested in finding ways to bring Khan Academy to South Africa and make it a useful resource to both teachers and learners. He presented an inspiring TEDxUCT talk last year outlining the background, as well as the impact and results Numeric has had. He also posted the following blog on the Khan Academy website:

 

A little over 15 months ago, we started an experiment.  We wanted to know if Khan Academy was viable in township (slum) areas in South Africa and if so, what type of impact it might have on numeracy.   Numeracy in South Africa is astonishingly weak, with just 2% of Grade 9s scoring over 50% on the annual national assessments in 2012. 

And so we set out to see if Khan Academy might be used as a catalyst for change.  But before I expound on the results of this experiment, I ought perhaps give a little more background on the environments we’re working in.

Townships in South Africa are not unlike the favelas of Brazil or the slums bordering Delhi and Calcutta in India.  They are urban areas that were, until the end of Apartheid in 1994, reserved for non-whites, but have now become residential hubs for the urbanizing masses.  They are typically built on the periphery of cities and tend to be characterized by high population density, poverty and unemployment.  Picture a ramshackle of makeshift houses constructed out of corrugated iron, wood scraps and cardboard, jigsawed together into a gigantic maze 5 miles wide and 10 miles across.  At the risk of generalising grossly, that’s more or less the picture I want you to have in mind as you read this article.

Now, townships in South Africa get a bad rap.  They are viewed as ‘dangerous’ places and it is considered unwise to visit them unless you know someone there, or visit them as part of a ‘township tour’.  Yet while crime rates in these areas are often high, the reputation does not do justice to the vibrant and persevering people who inhabit them.  In particular, townships are YOUNG!  On any given day, around two o’clock in the afternoon, the streets flood with uniformed, backpack-toting children on their way home from school.  And despite having barely two pennies to rub together, they are meticulously dressed – shiny black shoes, starched white collars – and have aspirations to match.   Most of the children in South Africa live in some form of township, which means that children growing up in these environments constitute the better part of the future of our country.

And yet it is supremely difficult to convince our best teachers to go and work in these areas.  They are offered good jobs in well-resourced schools most often located in the wealthy suburbs of the cities.  Principals at these schools compete fiercely for their skills.  And this is as it should be.  But it also entrenches the educational bias whereby a child’s access to quality education is directly proportional to the wealth of their family (see chart below).  

 

* University exemption rate refers to the percentage of learners who attain the academic marks in their final year of school that are necessary to gain access to South African universities.

So Numeric’s experiment was to see whether we could use Khan Academy, in conjunction with a slightly less skilled (and often unqualified) math coach, to create the high impact and stimulating learning environments enjoyed by kids living in wealthier suburbs.

The opportunity provided by Khan Academy premised on the following:  Videos do not argue about where they are played; they are unaffected by crime and environment. Appropriately licensed, they do not cost anything.  They do not grow weary, skip class, or grow jaded.  Instead, they convey their message enthusiastically, faithfully, clearly – time and time again.  A child may watch just as many videos as he/she has appetite for, and need never feel limited by the dragging on of a boring class or an inept teacher.  For many children in South Africa, a Khan Academy video will be their first exposure to what we might term ‘world class instruction’.  When complemented by the exercises on the Knowledge Map, Khan Academy becomes a powerful tool for turning the tide on numeracy in South Africa.

So what were the results of the experiment?  Well, it’s probably too early to draw any major conclusions, but we do have a few figures we’d like to share.  We currently run 7 Khan Academy classes across 3 different hubs in the Eastern and Western Cape provinces of South Africa.  The first pilot group of 20 Grade 9s has just completed its first twelve months of Khan Academy and their numbers are as follows:

* Total Khan Academy hours delivered:  2220

* Total Problems Solved:  27,988

* Total Problems per learner:  1399

* Total Khan Modules Complete:  1232

* Average Modules per learner:  62

Bearing in mind this is an afterschool programme, these are 27,988 math problems that would not otherwise have been attempted.  The 62 modules completed by the average learner constitute 62 gaps that those learners have filled.   But it’s more about just the numbers; it’s about creating excitement and enthusiasm around learning.  This is hard to convey in words, but perhaps a picture will suffice.

 

As we always say to our coaches, the tragedy in South Africa is not so much that kids don’t want to learn.  It’s that some kids DO want to learn, but can’t.  Khan Academy provides us one way to give these kids a world-class education without having to magically replenish our nation’s supply of teachers.  And who knows, perhaps one day these kids will become the inspirational and talented teachers we have waited for for so long!

—-

Andrew Einhorn is the founder and current CEO of Numeric.org. His TEDx talk on Numeric.org and Khan Academy is available here.